Merrimack Valley Life

The science of cooking


Andrew Leung follows the cooking-experiment instructions from his sixth-grade science teacher, Ephrem Klein. Haverhill Life photo by Sue-Lynn Leung

Andrew Leung follows the cooking-experiment instructions from his sixth-grade science teacher, Ephrem Klein. Haverhill Life photo by Sue-Lynn Leung

As schools remain closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Haverhill teachers are finding creative ways to engage students so that they can continue learn­ing from home. Ephrem Klein, a sixth-grade teacher at Nettle Middle School, recently hosted a fun and interactive live Google meeting called Finding Science in Everything.

Before the session, which involved some optional light cooking by students, Klein list­ed the ingredients and materials that he intended to use in the experiment. But he made it clear that students were not to follow along with the cooking portion of the presentation unless they had permis­sion from their parents to do so.

Klein didn’t tell students what he was going to make, and the mystery only added to the excitement as each step of the demonstration drew closer to the fi­nal result.

Whether they were following the recipe as they watched Klein on their screens or just watching, the students had the chance to learn about a wide range of scientific top­ics that Klein discussed, including measure­ment (of ingredients), chemical reactions (how milk becomes ricotta cheese), and food sources (flour comes from wheat).

Students were pleasantly surprised when they discovered that their teacher was making crepes with a sweet ricotta cheese filling. At our house, despite one small missed step due to the commotion of a live meeting with multiple voices and a lag on video, this experiment ended up tasting delicious.

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